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MYTH: The Rising Stock Market Only Benefits Rich People

“The rising stock market only benefits rich people.”

The media proclaims this or versions of this idea frequently, particularly when the market is rising as it has been recently.


Is it a true statement? No.


A rising stock market benefits whoever owns the shares of stock. The market is democratic – if you own shares and the price of those shares rises, then your position is worth more. This is true if you own 1 share, 100 shares or one million shares.


What is true? If you are NOT an investor, then you do not benefit.


The Roadside Scholar preaches getting into the investment world for just this reason. When the value of US companies goes up, then you, the owner, benefits. Once you become an owner, you get all the benefits and do not have to do anything more. You do not have to go to an office or work more hours -- nothing. If you invest long enough, your chances of becoming much wealthier are quite high.


Owning shares of stock in the public market is possible for all Americans, no matter your current position on the economic scale. You can be an owner of great American companies like Amazon, Wal-Mart, Google and Bank of America for as little as $50 and pay no brokerage commissions when you work with online brokerages, such Fidelity, Charles Schwab and Robinhood.


All you need to do is take that first step and INVEST.


Roadside Scholar Tip: Why not be rich? Start being an owner of great American companies today. Invest in yourself and your future.


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For more information and easy to understand explanations of important money matters go to www.theroadsidescholar.com or purchase The Roadside Scholar: Amazing Money Lessons from Behind the Fence.

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